The lady, the bear, and the elephant

The what? An elephant in Burnaby’s parks – a wild one? Has the circus come to town and there’s been escapees? And how come it’s not in the news? Well, read on to find out. I have an interesting miscellany of sightings made during August and September to report. And they’re all true!

The Lady

Let’s take a look at the lady first. In this case it’s a beautiful one: the painted lady butterfly.

Painted lady butterfly nectaring on black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) in my yard

Painted ladies are summer migrants to British Columbia from the arid regions of the southwestern US. The first migrants arrive here in spring, lay their eggs and produce a second generation of adults, of which this beautiful specimen is certainly one.

These second generation adults, unlike monarch butterflies, do not return south to the country of their ancestors. Most just hang on here, to finally die when the colder weather arrives. However, some do occasionally hibernate and make it through our winter as adult butterflies, to reappear the following spring. So this one does have some chance at a very long life for a butterfly.

Click on the image for a closer look

Look at the opalescent eye, and at the proboscis coming from the head to suck nectar from the black-eyed Susan.

Even the underwing view of the butterfly presents a treat for the eyes. The mix of pink/orange, the various shades of brown and tans, and the blue-centred eyespots on the hindwing all add to the powerful effect of this little beauty.

The Bear

And now for the bear. There have been sightings in the cul-de-sac where I live, which backs on to Deer Lake Park, but I missed bruin’s visit. A number of the walkers I meet in the park have asked: “Have you seen the bear?” “No”, I reply. It seems I’ve missed bruin in the park too.

Finally, I got talking to regular park walker John Gerbrandt this week. “Seen the bear?” he asked. Quick on the uptake, I replied, “Have you?” “Yup,” he said, “just down around the corner on this trail we’re on now.” Bruin missed again, and right on my regular route around the park too!

“Get a photo?” “Yes,” says John “with my cell phone.” Deer Lake’s bruin finally sighted, albeit second hand via John’s photo. As I said earlier, it’s all true, and here’s the photo to prove it.

Black bear on Deer Lake trail. Photo: John Gerbrandt

I don’t know if the bear is still in the park, but by all accounts it’s not aggressive. Likely in the park to feed on blackberries, which are now coming to the end of their season, it may have moved on looking for food elsewhere. However, if you do have an encounter, the animal shouldn’t be approached; just back off slowly, and take another route, or wait for the animal to move on. Bears may look cuddly, but they are powerful animals and somewhat unpredictable. Utmost caution is called for.

In one of those surprising coincidences that happen sometimes, I hadn’t quite finished writing this post when I had a live bear encounter of my very own today (Sept 16) at Burnaby Lake.

On the sports fields at the west end of the park, with all the excitement of the weekend’s sports activities going on busily and loudly, this bear was spotted sauntering along the east side of the field along the trail that parallels Still Creek before it empties into the lake. It too did not appear aggressive, nor afraid of the athletes at play nearby.

Black bear, Burnaby Lake Regional Park

The Elephant

And now for what I expect many readers have been waiting for – the elephant. Well, actually this elephant is a lot smaller than the pachyderm variety; it’s the enormous caterpillar of the elephant hawk-moth. At about 7.5 centimetres (3 inches) in length and about 1 cm in diameter, this guy is truly elephantine for a caterpillar. The moth’s name, however, is not due to its size, but due another feature of the caterpillar.

The front or head end of the caterpillar has a trunk-like snout that to some looks like an elephant trunk. You can see it partially protruding in the photograph below. It’s the extendable part that includes the head, beyond the four false eye spots.

Besides the partially protruding “trunk”, note the horn on the tail.

 

Here, the “trunk” is withdrawn into the head-end segment of the caterpillar’s body to make it look snake-like.

And what about those striking false eyes? With the trunk withdrawn, as shown above, the animal resembles a snake with a large head and four large eyes. A caterpillar this size would be a prized food item for a bird or other predator. However, these potential predators are frightened away by the caterpillar looking like a snake displaying those dramatic eyes.

As I write, the caterpillar has now almost certainly burrowed into the soil to pupate below the fuchsia on which it was feeding. It will spend the winter as a pupa, and with luck next July the spectacular adult hawk-moth will emerge to be appreciated for its beauty.

Elephant hawk-moth adult. Photo: jean pierre Hamon. Licensed under creative commons

This beautiful animal is, however, not native to North America but to Europe and parts of Asia. Not considered a pest, it was apparently introduced into British Columbia in the 1990’s, and seems to be well established in and around Vancouver and the Fraser Valley. Lucky us.

 

 

 

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Exploring Burnaby’s Parks and Natural Areas

Saturday November 22, 2014 saw the inaugural walk in the series I’ll be leading over the next few months called Exploring Burnaby’s Parks and Natural Areas.

A keen group of eleven participants, we found ourselves outdoors on a beautiful fall morning – blue sky, fluffy cumulus clouds, and sun. Yes, sun. Luckily, it seemed the weather gods were looking upon our enterprise favourably. We managed to find the one fine day between soaking Pacific fronts that had been storming across the region on the belly of the jet stream for a week; and then continued the downpours afterwards.

CentVGrnwGrp

Searching for a Fox Sparrow skulking in a blackberry thicket

Starting at the rugby fields at the foot of Sprott St., we wanted to see as much as we could during a relaxed 3 hour walk by following the Still Creek corridor upstream from its outlet at Burnaby Lake.

However, before we got to creekside, the large flock of Canada Geese on the rugby fields (not playing of course) got our attention. Taking a closer look at the more than 150 birds happily grazing the grass fields we noticed that in fact there wasn’t a single Canada Goose among them. They were the Canada’s smaller cousin, the Cackling Goose. Originally thought to be just small Canada Geese, scientific studies, including genetics, have recently shown these birds to be a separate but similar species,

CACG

Cackling Goose. Note the darker colour, small, rounded head, short neck, and small bill which separate the Cackling from the Canada.

Looking around from the parking area, we had excellent views of a flock of American Goldfinches actively feeding in the treetops. After walking across the fields to the banks of Still Creek, we were soon appreciating the many waterbirds at the mouth of Still Creek including Double-crested Cormorants, Buffleheads, and Common Mergansers. Shortly after, we walked north-west along the creek where we saw our Bird of the Day, a beautiful adult Northern Shrike, an uncommon bird in Burnaby. Perched at the top of a large black cottonwood, it was out of camera range unfortunately, but the spotting scope provided great views for everyone.

As we continued, a shrubby area off the main trail featured our most active group of birds for the morning feasting on the berry-sized fruit of Pacific crab apple trees, and red-berried hawthorns. Cedar Waxwings, Purple Finches, American Robins, Spotted Towhees, and Fox Sparrows made up the mixed feeding flock.

In all during the walk, we saw about 30 species of birds, but I won’t retell the details of each sighting, but encourage you to join us next time to see them for yourself. The schedule of walks and details will be published by the City of Burnaby. The dates are:

Saturday Jan 10 – Burnaby Lake Winter Water Birds
Friday Apr 17 – Welcoming Spring at Deer Lake Park
Tuesday Apr 28 – BBY Mnt Conservation Area Spring Songbirds
Saturday May 9 – Dawn Chorus at Deer Lake

A full list of our sightings on November 22 is shown below.

Cackling Goose  150
Canada Goose  6
Wood Duck  2
Mallard  10
Bufflehead  8
Hooded Merganser  1
Common Merganser  3
Double-crested Cormorant  25
Cooper’s Hawk  1
American Coot  7
Glaucous-winged Gull  5
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  25
Downy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  3
Northern Shrike  1
Steller’s Jay  1
Northwestern Crow  60
Black-capped Chickadee  8
Brown Creeper  1
Pacific Wren  2
Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
American Robin  40
European Starling  20
Cedar Waxwing  12
Spotted Towhee  10
Fox Sparrow  5
Song Sparrow  8
Purple Finch  5
American Goldfinch  25

 

Bobcat!

We’ve got salmon returning to our creeks once again, the coyotes are still howling at the passing emergency vehicles, and for the past few months, we’ve had a bobcat active in Deer Lake Park. This is life in the city that’s really hard to equal.

BobcatRevI’ve been waiting eagerly for a couple of months now to make this post. Bobbie (gender unknown), has been putting in regular appearances throughout Deer Lake Park, and during the summer was a regular in my neighbourhood on the park’s southern edge. But I couldn’t get a picture! In fact, for more than a week, I hadn’t even seen the feline when everyone in my household and many of my neighbours had – frustrating, even for a bird guy.

Without a picture, how could I make a decent blog post? Then finally, a visitor from Taiwan, Paul Chen, took the wonderful image above. Thank you Paul, for allowing me to use it here.

It’s probably a surprise to many readers that bobcats and humans can live so peacefully together. It’s remarkable what happens when we don’t persecute our wildlife, and we provide some habitat in which to make a living. This is a tribute to “untidy,” wilder parks that have habitats as close to “natural” as we can manage in the city. The payoff is huge. Keep Burnaby green (and a bit scruffy around the edges, please).

CatSignClse

 

Not that we haven’t had Bobcats in the City previously; I know of reports going back to at least 2009 at both Deer Lake and Burnaby Lake. But we urban dwellers are not used to seeing the larger species of North American wild cats, and we’re certainly not expecting to see them in the city. So, if surprised by one, we often jump to the wrong conclusion – cougar!

As you can see from the above signs posted this fall in the park, park walkers were confused as to the identity of the large cat many had seen. City staff attempted to put people at ease, and so posted a number of the above signs. However, it’s hard to win when you’re trying to put people at ease. Some people interpreted the signs to indicate there could be a cougar in the area. Oh well!

A close look at the real bobcat picture above shows that the one living here does not quite fit the silhouette shown on the sign. Our Bobbie is proportionally longer legged, and generally more slender. However, the short, black-tipped tail is diagnostic for the species. A bobbed tail gives it its name – bobcat.

Bobcats are carnivores, and the literature suggests rabbits and hares are favourite prey, neither of which is common in Burnaby. When the cat was active in my neighbourhood it was feeding on gray squirrels and its hunting technique was interesting.

BobcatPrey

Remains of bobcat prey – a gray squirrel tail and foot

My neighbour’s apple tree is always a favourite source of food for the squirrels in the fall. If you’ve ever watched a squirrel carrying a pilfered apple in its mouth, you’ll recognize that it must be seriously visually impaired. Bobbie would lie in wait and pounce as Nutkin was about to leap the fence with its prize. Twice it was seen in the early morning carrying captured squirrels over the fence. It seems too that they were eaten out in open on the lawn. This is one relaxed bobcat. The apples, of course, were always left behind. No apple sauce with squirrel dinner for this predator. Since the Eastern gray squirrel is an introduced species, I am pleased that the population is feeding this beautiful, native cat.

It’s clear from our experience here that bobcats can live well on urban fringes, and this is being noticed throughout the continent. In Deer Lake Park there are plenty of Townsend’s voles in the meadows that would also provide food. As the picture above shows, perhaps bobcats would avail themselves of some salmon too if available.

They are beautiful, opportunistic predators that we are so fortunate to have living with us. However, they are wild cats feeding on whatever they can find so we have yet one more reason to keep our domestic cats indoors and to make sure other small pets are leashed.

C&CSigns

And as the sign indicates there’a at least one other predator abroad that should encourage us to keep our pets protected. Yes, it’s the coyote, the other large, four legged predator in our parks.

CoyoteGrdn

Wily takes a walk through my garden

 

 

 

A Little Local “Leaf Peeping”

Recent reports say that parts of Eastern Canada have spectacular fall colours this year, and the pursuit of “leaf peeping”, as it’s known back East – viewing and photographing fall colours –  is in full swing.

With our temperatures dropping to single digits, and the season’s first snow dusting the North Shore Mountains this past weekend, it’s the right time to do a little local “leaf peeping.” While we don’t have whole mountainsides covered with deciduous trees – our dominant trees are evergreens – we still have some real beauty to enjoy. We just have to look a little closer.

Deer Lake Park – looking north

Our native red-leaved species include the red-osier dogwood above – a common shrub in our parks, and the vine maple, a small tree which can be a spectacular contrast to the dark greens of our forest conifers.

Vine maple – Deer Lake forest

So why do some trees’ leaves turn red, and others yellow? It’s all about the chemistry of leaves. As the amount of daylight declines in the fall, leaves stop making food through photosynthesis. The food maker, the green stuff of leaves, is chlorophyll. In fall it stops being replaced by the tree or shrub, and slowly degrades and disappears from the leaves revealing the yellow pigments previously hidden.

Here’s an example of a big-leafed maple – our large, native maple – showing the process in action. As the green chlorophyll disappears, the yellow pigment is revealed.

In technical terms, the degrading chlorophyll slowly fades to reveal the xanthophyll pigments in the leaves. For trees with red fall leaves, a slightly different, but related process takes place. The decline in chlorophyll is accompanied by the production of anthocyanins (red pigments) related to the end-of-season increase in sugar production and storage in the trees. Red-osier dogwood shows this process well.

Our bright red street trees undergo the same changes, but most of them are Eastern imports planted for easy maintenance, and of course for their spectacular fall colours.

So while we don’t have mountainsides of red, we have our fall beauty on a smaller scale.

Big leaf maple and red-osier dogwood – Deer Lake Park

And finally, just to show the birds haven’t been ignored this week, here’s a vine maple nicely setting off the blue of a Steller’s Jay. You’ll have to look closely to see it. Can’t see it? Click the image to enlarge it, and take another look. When I took the picture, I didn’t know I’d captured the bird too!