Sphinx surprise

A lazy, summer Sunday afternoon – the garden is a familiar scene; flowers waving in the breeze, insects buzzing in the air, and birds singing from the forest behind. And then, in an instant, the scene changes. Something different was hovering and flying around the bright pink campion flowers growing in the back border. A small hummingbird, perhaps a rare visitor, it was definitely not one of our regular Rufous or Anna’s types. My birder brain went rapidly into full attention mode. What was this?

Hovering at each flower before rapidly moving on to the next, the new visitor was actually a sphinx moth or hawkmoth taking nectar from the blossoms. Not the rare hummingbird I first imagined, but nonetheless an animal that I haven’t seen for many years in the area. And just maybe as exciting. Also called a hummingbird moth because, as I just demonstrated, the species is frequently mistaken for a hummingbird.

Grabbing the camera, I headed out into the yard to see if I could get a picture. This was one fast-moving insect, and a real challenge to photograph as the picture below attests. The wing beats are so fast, I never did capture an unblurred picture of them.

Bedstraw or Gallium sphinx moth

However, it was captivating to watch the moth flying around the bright pink campions. Perhaps the pictures do indeed capture the action.

With its wings a constant blur, the moth presented the next challenge. Did I see and photograph enough detail of the moth to make a correct indentification? Now, as you know, I’m a birder so I had to do a little research on-line for this one. I knew enough to recognize it as a sphinx moth, but as to exactly which species. Well!

My first impressions led me to decide is was likely a white-lined sphinx moth. This is the common and widespread species in our area; the default sphinx moth so to speak. However, digging a little deeper, I found that there is another, less common, but very similar species, the bedstraw or gallium sphinx moth. Careful study of many on-line pictures and reading various descriptions led me to decide that our visitor was indeed the bedstraw species.

Like hummingbirds, sphinx moths hover at flowers to suck up and drink the nectar that they need for energy – a good example of the convergent evolution of two unrelated species. The hummingbird uses its extendable tongue, the sphinx moth uses its extendable proboscis to draw the nectar into its mouth. Here’s a close up of the sphinx moth’s specialized mouthpiece at work.

Bedstraw sphinx moth, nectaring

To see what’s going on here, click once on the photo above to enlarge it. The proboscis is the dark coloured, thin tube that extends a short distance horizontally from the head of the moth, and then makes a 90 degree downturn before entering the centre of the flower. When not in use, the long proboscis is carried coiled-up at the front of the head.

But why “bedstraw”? Adult sphinx moths feed exclusively on nectar of many flowers, but it’s the food plant of the caterpillar which gives the species its name. Both bedstraw and fireweed, another favourite larval-stage food plant, are common plants in Deer Lake Park, which is right behind my house, and I’m sure this is the place where this adult spent its early life as a caterpillar.

Bedstraw (Galium sp), Deer Lake Park

And here’s the other favourite food plant of the caterpillar.

Fireweed, Deer Lake Park

The visitor didn’t stay long. It flew along the forest edge, seemingly looking for more flowers for nectar, and then disappeared into the park.

July is the peak of the adults’ flight season, so keep your eyes open for this beautiful moth in our parks. Like most moths, the sphinx moth does fly at night, but this species also flies in the afternoons, and we then have the chance to see this hovering beauty.

Bobcat!

We’ve got salmon returning to our creeks once again, the coyotes are still howling at the passing emergency vehicles, and for the past few months, we’ve had a bobcat active in Deer Lake Park. This is life in the city that’s really hard to equal.

BobcatRevI’ve been waiting eagerly for a couple of months now to make this post. Bobbie (gender unknown), has been putting in regular appearances throughout Deer Lake Park, and during the summer was a regular in my neighbourhood on the park’s southern edge. But I couldn’t get a picture! In fact, for more than a week, I hadn’t even seen the feline when everyone in my household and many of my neighbours had – frustrating, even for a bird guy.

Without a picture, how could I make a decent blog post? Then finally, a visitor from Taiwan, Paul Chen, took the wonderful image above. Thank you Paul, for allowing me to use it here.

It’s probably a surprise to many readers that bobcats and humans can live so peacefully together. It’s remarkable what happens when we don’t persecute our wildlife, and we provide some habitat in which to make a living. This is a tribute to “untidy,” wilder parks that have habitats as close to “natural” as we can manage in the city. The payoff is huge. Keep Burnaby green (and a bit scruffy around the edges, please).

CatSignClse

 

Not that we haven’t had Bobcats in the City previously; I know of reports going back to at least 2009 at both Deer Lake and Burnaby Lake. But we urban dwellers are not used to seeing the larger species of North American wild cats, and we’re certainly not expecting to see them in the city. So, if surprised by one, we often jump to the wrong conclusion – cougar!

As you can see from the above signs posted this fall in the park, park walkers were confused as to the identity of the large cat many had seen. City staff attempted to put people at ease, and so posted a number of the above signs. However, it’s hard to win when you’re trying to put people at ease. Some people interpreted the signs to indicate there could be a cougar in the area. Oh well!

A close look at the real bobcat picture above shows that the one living here does not quite fit the silhouette shown on the sign. Our Bobbie is proportionally longer legged, and generally more slender. However, the short, black-tipped tail is diagnostic for the species. A bobbed tail gives it its name – bobcat.

Bobcats are carnivores, and the literature suggests rabbits and hares are favourite prey, neither of which is common in Burnaby. When the cat was active in my neighbourhood it was feeding on gray squirrels and its hunting technique was interesting.

BobcatPrey

Remains of bobcat prey – a gray squirrel tail and foot

My neighbour’s apple tree is always a favourite source of food for the squirrels in the fall. If you’ve ever watched a squirrel carrying a pilfered apple in its mouth, you’ll recognize that it must be seriously visually impaired. Bobbie would lie in wait and pounce as Nutkin was about to leap the fence with its prize. Twice it was seen in the early morning carrying captured squirrels over the fence. It seems too that they were eaten out in open on the lawn. This is one relaxed bobcat. The apples, of course, were always left behind. No apple sauce with squirrel dinner for this predator. Since the Eastern gray squirrel is an introduced species, I am pleased that the population is feeding this beautiful, native cat.

It’s clear from our experience here that bobcats can live well on urban fringes, and this is being noticed throughout the continent. In Deer Lake Park there are plenty of Townsend’s voles in the meadows that would also provide food. As the picture above shows, perhaps bobcats would avail themselves of some salmon too if available.

They are beautiful, opportunistic predators that we are so fortunate to have living with us. However, they are wild cats feeding on whatever they can find so we have yet one more reason to keep our domestic cats indoors and to make sure other small pets are leashed.

C&CSigns

And as the sign indicates there’a at least one other predator abroad that should encourage us to keep our pets protected. Yes, it’s the coyote, the other large, four legged predator in our parks.

CoyoteGrdn

Wily takes a walk through my garden

 

 

 

Halloween Nightmare – for a snail!

It’s All Hallow’s Eve. Gore-spattered ghosts, ghouls, and goblins roam our streets in packs.  Vacant eye-sockets glare at us from dark doorways, and dripping bushes. Blood curdling wails of pain and screams of fear echo through the neighbourhoods.

Putting the frighteners on ourselves is all part of the fun, and the scary stuff is not that nightmarish when we know that once all ‘tributes’ have been collected, a warm home awaits us with hot chocolate and a feast of goodies.

However, from our comfy seats at home, can we give a thought for the lowly snail? If snails could think like we do (they don’t) surely their Halloween Nightmare would be one that would terrify us too – trapped, unable to move, and being eaten alive, head first, Hannibal Lecter style.

And that’s what’s happening below; not in the movies, and not in our imaginations, but for real.

Calosoma and snail

Calosoma ground beetle eating a snail.
Click to enlarge.

With the beetle’s mandibles plunged into the opening of the snail’s shell, the hapless gastropod is being eaten alive, head first. I witnessed the dramatic scene above while gardening this week .

Ground beetles, like the one above, are quite common carnivorous denizens of our gardens. Often unseen because of their nocturnal habits, we frequently disturb them while digging around in our gardens. Far less frequently do we see them with their prey.

However, it’s a good reminder that many of the invertebrates in our gardens are actually doing us favour, although I’m sure the snail wouldn’t see it that way. In this case our friendly beetle is consuming a garden-plant-eating snail. Remember: Don’t squash the insects, and do avoid the pesticides!

The two hard “shields” covering the back of the beetle and protecting the wings underneath are called the elytra. They are nicely striated in the above specimen, and suggest that it’s in the Calosoma genus. As I’m a bird man, and less of a bug man, my identification of the beetle is provisional.

And while I’m on the topic of ground beetles, I thought I would take the opportunity to share a picture of another striking member of this large family of insects. I managed to photograph this beauty last year in my garden after a brief shower left it with a shiny coating of water over its smooth, red elytra. Again, my identification is provisional. I believe this one is a member of the Carabus genus.

Both beetles are in the 25 to 30 mm size range.

Carabus beetle

Carabus ground beetle after a rain shower.
Click to enlarge

Take a close look at the beetle above and you’ll notice it’s missing part of its left front leg, and part of its right antenna.  It’s an eat-and-be-eaten world all around us. So if snails could have Halloween nightmares, then I’m certain that ground beetles would have theirs too. Who can imagine what frightening beasts could attack and dismember ground beetles?

Happy? Halloween.