Kestrels Breeding in Burnaby

This past Sunday (July 16), following my own advice to “… get out there and take a look”, I was cycling east along North Fraser Way in Burnaby’s Big Bend area when an interesting bird silhouette caught my eye.

Kestrel silhouetted on a dead snag in the Big Bend area

Grabbing my bins from the bike pannier to get a better look, I was soon able to resolve the dark shape into that of a Kestrel. A “good” bird anywhere in the Lower Mainland, and a real and unexpected treat to see in Burnaby.

Grabbing my camera, I started a slow walk along Abbotsford Street toward the perched bird hoping for some good pictures, or at least a record shot of this Burnaby rarity, when I noticed a second Kestrel, this one sitting low down but half hidden in a thicket next to the tree in which the the first bird was perched. Two Kestrels! Wow!

Juvenile American Kestrel

Juvenile Kestrels are difficult to visually tell apart from their adult parents; however, this guy (yes, it’s a male), was making the occasional begging call, and when the adult male swooped down into the grassy road edge to catch some prey, and then flew up with it, junior was in hot pursuit for a meal.

So this was a recently fledged bird, which virtually guarantees it was hatched right here in the Big Bend area. In the 1 to 2 weeks immediately post-fledging, the young birds solicit food from their parents. After this period they cease begging as they become adept at capturing prey independently. So this young guy left the nest and took his first flights within the previous 2 weeks, and as a young, relatively weak flyer would not have travelled into the area from outside. It was Burnaby born and raised. Yay!

The Kestrel diet is primarily insects, especially grasshoppers, beetles, and dragonflies, and small rodents, especially voles and mice. All of the these prey items would be available in the area. The farming here is predominantly mixed vegetables, with some large areas of cranberry bogs to the north. The field edges are nicely unkempt, scruffy, and weedy providing lots of just the kinds of foods Kestrels need. Farming and wildlife can happily co-exist if the farming isn’t too industrialized and intensive.

Fields of vegetables with good Kestrel foraging habitat along its weedy edges in Burnaby’s Big Bend.

 

Fallow field of rough grass meadow full of insects, and small rodents – Kestrel food

I don’t know how much pesticide use there is on these farms, but the insect life was abundant when I visited. Perhaps this is a sign it is minimal, which is not only good for our health, but also that of the insect-eating Kestrels and other birds. Along the Byrne Road side of the area, the organic farm that was Urban Digs is now getting going again under new stewardship and name – Seed of Life Farm. No pesticide use there for sure. Another positive for the Kestrels.

So where would the nest itself likely have been? Kestrels are cavity nesters, using woodpecker-excavated and natural cavities in larger trees which are surrounded by large open areas for hunting food. We’ve got the open patches in Big Bend, but not so much the larger trees in the immediate area where I saw the birds.  However, there are many large black cottonwoods surrounding the fields, and Kestrels are known to use buildings too for nesting. A number of the old farm buildings in the area looked quite suitable to me.

Vegetable fields surrounded by the old farm buildings which may have provided a suitable Kestrel nest site

Both male and female Kestrels feed the young except for a short period after first hatching when the male provisions the female and the chicks on the nest. After 7-10 days both parents feed the young and this continues through the post-hatching period.

Breaking News (July18)

Went down to Big Bend again this morning to check up on the progress of the Kestrels. Despite the fact that somehow I had put a mostly un-charged battery in my camera and as a result missed all sorts of photo opportunities, it was a wonderful morning. The news is getting better.

There were at least 4 kestrels there this morning. Two adults, a male and female, and two juveniles, a male and female. Likely this represents the whole family, but given the birds were very active hunting and begging, I could have missed more family members. The young are still being fed by the parents, but are taking up perches and stances showing they are making the transition to feeding on their own. No more perching low down and tucked in like the juvenile I first observed Sunday.

The accepted common name for this species is American Kestrel. These ones, of course, are “Canadian” born and raised. In fact, I think we can safely claim this family group as “Burnaby” Kestrels.

Adult male “Burnaby” American Kestrel

If you head down to N Fraser Way and Abbotsford St. to see the happenings for yourself, please respect the farmland and private property, and stay on the roads. This area is not a public park.

 

 

Exploring Burnaby’s Parks and Natural Areas

Saturday November 22, 2014 saw the inaugural walk in the series I’ll be leading over the next few months called Exploring Burnaby’s Parks and Natural Areas.

A keen group of eleven participants, we found ourselves outdoors on a beautiful fall morning – blue sky, fluffy cumulus clouds, and sun. Yes, sun. Luckily, it seemed the weather gods were looking upon our enterprise favourably. We managed to find the one fine day between soaking Pacific fronts that had been storming across the region on the belly of the jet stream for a week; and then continued the downpours afterwards.

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Searching for a Fox Sparrow skulking in a blackberry thicket

Starting at the rugby fields at the foot of Sprott St., we wanted to see as much as we could during a relaxed 3 hour walk by following the Still Creek corridor upstream from its outlet at Burnaby Lake.

However, before we got to creekside, the large flock of Canada Geese on the rugby fields (not playing of course) got our attention. Taking a closer look at the more than 150 birds happily grazing the grass fields we noticed that in fact there wasn’t a single Canada Goose among them. They were the Canada’s smaller cousin, the Cackling Goose. Originally thought to be just small Canada Geese, scientific studies, including genetics, have recently shown these birds to be a separate but similar species,

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Cackling Goose. Note the darker colour, small, rounded head, short neck, and small bill which separate the Cackling from the Canada.

Looking around from the parking area, we had excellent views of a flock of American Goldfinches actively feeding in the treetops. After walking across the fields to the banks of Still Creek, we were soon appreciating the many waterbirds at the mouth of Still Creek including Double-crested Cormorants, Buffleheads, and Common Mergansers. Shortly after, we walked north-west along the creek where we saw our Bird of the Day, a beautiful adult Northern Shrike, an uncommon bird in Burnaby. Perched at the top of a large black cottonwood, it was out of camera range unfortunately, but the spotting scope provided great views for everyone.

As we continued, a shrubby area off the main trail featured our most active group of birds for the morning feasting on the berry-sized fruit of Pacific crab apple trees, and red-berried hawthorns. Cedar Waxwings, Purple Finches, American Robins, Spotted Towhees, and Fox Sparrows made up the mixed feeding flock.

In all during the walk, we saw about 30 species of birds, but I won’t retell the details of each sighting, but encourage you to join us next time to see them for yourself. The schedule of walks and details will be published by the City of Burnaby. The dates are:

Saturday Jan 10 – Burnaby Lake Winter Water Birds
Friday Apr 17 – Welcoming Spring at Deer Lake Park
Tuesday Apr 28 – BBY Mnt Conservation Area Spring Songbirds
Saturday May 9 – Dawn Chorus at Deer Lake

A full list of our sightings on November 22 is shown below.

Cackling Goose  150
Canada Goose  6
Wood Duck  2
Mallard  10
Bufflehead  8
Hooded Merganser  1
Common Merganser  3
Double-crested Cormorant  25
Cooper’s Hawk  1
American Coot  7
Glaucous-winged Gull  5
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  25
Downy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  3
Northern Shrike  1
Steller’s Jay  1
Northwestern Crow  60
Black-capped Chickadee  8
Brown Creeper  1
Pacific Wren  2
Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
American Robin  40
European Starling  20
Cedar Waxwing  12
Spotted Towhee  10
Fox Sparrow  5
Song Sparrow  8
Purple Finch  5
American Goldfinch  25

 

July – Moult Month for Waterfowl

July is mid-summer for us humans, and the time of year when we head out to our parks and beaches. However, despite the attractions of the season, it’s just not as pleasant and pretty down at the Deer Lake beach as it usually is. In fact, things are looking downright scruffy and untidy.

All that feather shedding and goose pooping are making quite the mess. What’s going on?

For sure it’s the birds making the mess, and over one hundred Canada Geese can make a good one, but before getting ticked off, spare them a sympathetic thought. July is a pretty tough month to be a goose or a duck. They’re going through a big part of their annual moult. It’s biology and they have no choice.

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Not a pretty sight – moulting geese crowd Deer Lake beach

Walking around the beach, feathers are strewn everywhere and most of them are from the park’s ducks and geese.

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For all species of waterfowl (ducks, swans and geese), moulting is a pretty dramatic and stressful affair. Not only do they shed some of their body feathers, but also their wing feathers. And not just one by one; waterfowl lose their flight feathers all at once. Now if your flight feathers are gone, you’re flightless, and that can be serious – especially if you need to escape from a predator.

So our ducks and geese gather in areas where they have easy access to an escape route – in this case to the lake itself. The beaches at Deer Lake and Piper Spit at Burnaby Lake offer great locations for moulting birds.

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Canada Goose with all its flight feathers missing from moulting

Take a look at the goose above. The long, dark wing feathers that extend to the rear and partly cover the tail are completely missing and expose the black back and white rump that we see like this only at this time of year.

Here’s another bird, and here you can see the newly growing pin feathers, or blood feathers as they are also called. Over a period of a couple of weeks they will become fully developed and fully functioning wing feathers, or primaries. Right now they’re just tiny stubs.

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Note the emerging wing feathers encased in a blue, waxy coating on each side of the bird

The base of the pin feathers shown above are engorged with blood to aid their rapid growth. You can just see the new feather material emerging from the tip of the waxy coating. Damage to these pin feathers at this stage can be dangerous for the birds – it can lead to significant blood loss.

A little further along in the moulting process, here’s a bird with partially-grown new flight feathers that have not yet reached their full length.

CANG3

The dark-coloured, newly growing flight feathers (primaries) are best seen on the bird’s left wing. Note the still-to-be-moulted, old, paler, worn-looking, unshed flight feather on the extreme lower left.

As the flight feathers continue to grow they will once again cover the white rump and much of the tail. The bird above is also growing replacement tail feathers – note the uneven length at the tips. Growing so many large feathers at one time uses a lot of the birds’ energy, and they tend to loaf around to conserve it.

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Loafing on the beach, and then bathing in the lake. Remind you of anything?

Loafing on the beach enables the moulting birds to bathe frequently and preen those new feathers into good condition. This is important work; they will have to last until this time next year before being replaced.

Ducks also moult their flight feathers after breeding, but their transformation is even more dramatic. As they moult their wing feathers, they enter what is known as eclipse plumage. The males loose all their fancy body feathering, and often look much the same as females of the species. However, given they are flightless, it’s no doubt best to be as inconspicuous as possible. Plus the fancy, female-attracting plumage is no longer required now that breeding has just finished.

MALLHead

This drake Mallard is losing his glossy green head feathers, rufous breast plumage and gray back and sides as he moves further into eclipse plumage

Here’s a picture taken earlier this year showing how much the drake Mallard transforms from eclipse to breeding plumage. Eclipse above, breeding below.

MALLAlt

Breeding plumage Mallard – the plumage we see most of the year

Ducks are very unusual in the bird world as the males have their two annual moults very close together in summer and fall. Most birds that take on different plumages for the breeding season have their second moult in the spring, ready for the breeding season.

Ducks in contrast, form pairs in the winter and males develop their pre-breeding finery during fall to be ready for winter pre-breeding pairing.

Lastly, here’s a very scruffy looking Gadwall at the lake.

GADWEclipse

A very “female looking” drake Gadwall in eclipse plumage

Along with moulting waterfowl, many other birds  also undergo a moult at this time of year. Just like our ducks and geese, even our crows come down to the beach to make use of the fresh water from Buckingham Creek to bathe and condition their new feathers.

NOCRBeach

Moulting crows gather around the mouth of Buckingham Creek

Unlike waterfowl, crows do not moult their flight feathers all at once, but lose and replace them serially over a period of several weeks. Such a moult strategy enables these birds to continue flying while undergoing this annual transformation. Looking up at crows flying overhead at this time of year you will notice the shape of the wings at the trailing edge is somewhat jagged, the result of new feathers growing in and others having been shed.

NOCRMoult

Crow showing its moult in progress

The picture above is really illustrates what’s going on. This Northwestern Crow photographed last week at Deer Lake shows both body and wing feathers being replaced. The old, sun-bleached, brownish feathers contrast quite strikingly with the glossy, black new feathers just growing in. This bird has also lost feathers at the base of the bill, likely as a result of continually stuffing food into the mouths of its hungry young. All will be restored to glossy glory in a few weeks.

It’s enough to make you want to take a bath.

NOCRBathe

Bathing Northwestern Crow, Buckingham Creek

While photographing the geese, ducks and crows shown above, I suddenly noticed feeding right along the edge of the Deer Lake beach were these two Long-billed Dowitchers – a rare treat at this location.

LBDO1

Long-billed Dowitchers newly arrived from Northern breeding grounds

These two birds are adults in worn, breeding plumage. You’ll have to take my word on the “worn” part. Now these sandpipers have a different moulting strategy from the birds we’ve looked at so far. After breeding, the dowitchers migrate from the breeding grounds and then moult into their drabber winter plumage on the wintering grounds.

And many Long-billed Dowitchers spend the winter at Burnaby Lake. Here’s a picture from last winter. Look at the transformation. Breeding above, winter below.

LBDO

Long-billed Dowitchers in winter plumage

You can just see in the flanks of the bird below the first few hints of the greyer feathers of the winter plumage.

LBDO3

Long-billed Dowitcher, Deer Lake beach

With all this shedding of feathers and growing of new ones it’s enough to make you want to scratch that itch. It’s that time of year.

LBDOItch

****

It’s been a busy spring of birding and travel that has kept me away from the blog. However, it’s back, at least for a while.

 

Northern Harriers – Update

Perhaps quite predictable, but good news nonetheless for the prospects for raising another generation of Northern Harriers at Deer Lake was the arrival on the breeding territory of a female harrier just a couple of days after the male was scouting out the lay of of the land.

NOHAfem2HungHR

Female Northern Harrier newly arrived on her breeding territory.
Photo: Jason Hung

And of course we can anticipate the outcome of a male and a female on the breeding territory. The male was soon in courtship mode, and pursued the female whenever she landed on the meadow.

NOHAmale2HungHR

Male harrier takes off in pursuit of female
Photo: Jason Hung

Copulation was not captured photographically, but here the male is approaching the female very closely.

HarrierPairHR

Harrier pair. Photo: Jason Hung

In the meantime I’ll keep you posted as events unfold. Even better, get down to the meadows and check out the action for yourself. However, please keep out of the meadows and observe from the trails. The birds’ breeding success depends on us, and our dogs not disturbing them.

I’ve also updated the photographs with higher resolution images on the previous post about the harriers at Deer Lake. Click here to view that post and the upgraded images.

Cooper’s Hawks

Cooper’s Hawks are likely the commonest raptor found in Burnaby, but much of the time you wouldn’t know it. Like all members of the accipiter family (true hawks) they are specialized, bird hunting, ambush predators, that mostly remain hidden deep in cover from where they launch surprise attacks, and pursue their avian prey through the woods.

However, in July and early August when the young birds have just fledged (left the nest), they frequently perch out in the open for a few days, noisily begging for food. Recently, friends in North Burnaby phoned to tell me that they and their neighbours were being entertained by a family of four recently-fledged, and two adult Cooper’s Hawks in nearby Montrose Park.

COHAGroup

Three of four juvenile Cooper’s Hawks await their parents’ return with food – Montrose Park.

When I headed over there the next day, the birds seemed to have learned their first lesson as young raptors – stay hidden. No doubt the youngsters had been mobbed by smaller birds, and the neighbourhood crows, which will attempt to drive all raptors from their territory. But, while staying hidden, they were still calling loudly for food. After a bit of searching, and using their long, wheezing whistles to guide us, we finally managed to find a couple of the young birds perched, and begging for food in the deciduous trees along the Trans-Canada Trail through Montrose Park.

COHA#1

Juvenile Cooper’s Hawk concealed in big-leaf maple, begging for food

The adults were not  around when we were there, and were likely out hunting for the young birds’ next meals. Over the next two or three weeks the young will continue to be fed by their parents, but they will increasingly be left to their own devices until, and after four or five weeks, they will be abandoned to their make their own way in the world. If they haven’t honed their hunting skills sufficiently in the meantime, they’ll not survive. They may still hang around in the area of their birth up to six weeks after fledging. You should have a good chance of finding one if you head down to Montrose.

It’s a steep learning curve for the young Cooper’s Hawks to become independent hunters, but they’re born with all the equipment they need. Their incredibly sharp vision puts human  eyesight into the piker division. Cooper’s Hawks can not only resolve much greater detail at greater distances than humans, but they are also able the track the rapid movements of their prey through the forests, which for us would simply be a blur. Their binocular vision gives them the very precise judgement of distances which is essential for capturing fast-moving prey.

COHA#6

Forward facing eyes give Cooper’s Hawks a wide field of binocular vision, essential for hunting.

Cooper’s Hawks wings are relatively short and rounded, whereas their tails are relatively long. You can see in the picture above the long extension of the tail beyond the wing-tips. This combination makes them stunningly maneuverable in flight. Fast to accelerate, they are able to make incredibly sharp turns at very high speeds to pursue their prey through dense vegetation. And they often seem totally fearless when chasing down their quarry.  I recall watching one chase a starling from a bird feeder, and then crash full force into a dense shrub, into which the starling had plunged to make its escape, only to yank it out, clutched in one foot.

COHA#4

Long, sharp talons make for a deadly grip on the Cooper’s Hawk’s prey

Cooper’s Hawks are a success story in the urban bird world. Once in serious decline across North America due to hunting, pesticide contamination, and loss of forest habitats, they have now rebounded and adapted extremely well to urban environments, including our parks, where they find plenty of prey.

Andy Stewart in Victoria has had a long term program of banding and monitoring Cooper’s Hawks in the capital city, and he has discovered some of the highest densities ever recorded on the continent just across the Straight from us. I would not be surprised at all if we have comparable population densities of these beautiful predators right here in Burnaby.

Hawks banded in Victoria have been recorded a number of times on this side of the Strait of Georgia. Keep an eye out around your bird feeders this winter. Cooper’s Hawks often snatch their prey from our gardens.

To read more about Andy’s work, click here. A longer article, with a more continental perspective on Cooper’s Hawks can be found here.

Buckingham Creek Bonanza – Again!

An email from Deer Lake resident Leigh Palmer today, reporting salmon spawning again in Buckingham Creek, had me rushing down to the lake to view the action. And sure enough, after the chum salmon arrival and spawning in the creek starting at the beginning of November, here we are at the beginning of December, and spawning coho salmon are now in the creek.

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Tucked tightly under the bank, the fish were visible, but very hard to photograph given the dim light along the creek. Remember to click on the pictures for larger images.

Some redd building action was visible from the viewpoint at the edge of the parking area, next to the playground swings, but there too photography was a challenge.

Coho#2

However, our very good fortune was that Dr Palmer managed to make a beautiful video this weekend of the fish spawning. The spots along the back, and the bright red sides identify them as coho.

Click here to view the action.

The chum spawning here in November were much more subdued in their colouring (see earlier posts), and a few final decaying remains of that marvellous event are still visible along the creek. With the coho here now, our salmon viewing season at Deer Lake has just been doubled – a real bonanza at Buckingham Creek!